Greece Guide

Wildlife World Zoo Coupons

Posted by greeceguide on July 29, 2011

Wildlife World Zoo and Aquarium in Litchfield Park, Arizona is the largest zoo in Arizona and the Aquarium. It houses over 3,000 animals of 600 species and more than half a million people visit the zoo each year.

Wildlife World Zoo is a privately owned and operated and is not supported by public tax money, grants or donations, because the cost of the tickets are very expensive, but if you’re on vacation or living in the area, is definitely worth a visit – just try to find discounts and Wildlife World Zoo Coupons.

Along with the opportunity to see different animals near Wildlife World Zoo offers a variety of shows on a daily basis to visitors. Several times a day Lory parrot feeding is done is Turaco bird feeding.

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Climate

Posted by greeceguide on June 30, 2009

The climate of Greece can be categorised into three types (the Mediterranean, the Alpine and the Temperate) that influence well-defined regions of its territory. The Pindus mountain range strongly affects the climate of the country by making the western side of it (areas prone to the south-westerlies) wetter on average than the areas lying to the east of it (lee side of the mountains). The Mediterranean type of climate features mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers. The Cyclades, the Dodecanese, Crete, Eastern Peloponessus and parts of the Sterea Ellada region are mostly affected by this particular type of climate. Temperatures rarely reach extreme values along the coasts, although, with Greece being a highly mountainous country, snowfalls occur frequently in winter. It sometimes snows even in the Cyclades or the Dodecanese.

The Alpine type is dominant mainly in the mountainous areas of Northwestern Greece (Epirus, Central Greece, Thessaly, Western Macedonia) as well as in the central parts of Peloponnese, including the prefectures of Achaia, Arcadia and parts of Laconia, where extensions of the Pindus mountain range pass by. Finally, the Temperate type affects Central Macedonia and East Macedonia and Thrace; it features cold, damp winters and hot, dry summers. Athens is located in a transitional area featuring both the Mediterranean and the Temperate types. The city’s northern suburbs are dominated by the temperate type while the downtown area and the southern suburbs enjoy a typical Mediterranean type.

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Conference Facilities

Posted by greeceguide on April 16, 2009

greece5086Conference tourism, targeted at academic, business, or cultural markets is a cornerstone of the Greek national tourism policy. As a result, the Greek Government, with strong support from local authorities, has been offering lucrative cash grants, leasing and employment subsidies and tax allowances to establish new conference facilities and expand existing ones. In a recent report in Meeting and Incentive Travel, Greece was ranked eighth in the world in overnight stays for conferences. Figures from the Tourism Satellite Accounting Research, conducted by WTTC (World Travel & Tourism Council) project a worldwide increase in revenues in business travel to Greece from US $1.51 bn. in 2001 to US $2.69 bn. in 2011. In 1998, the figure stood at US $1.18 bn.

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Eurotas

Posted by greeceguide on January 14, 2009

Eurotas (now Iri) – Lakonia main river with a length of 82 km, the land in southern Greece, and comes in advance Chelmos, flows through Sparta and flows into the sea east of Gythion. According to the ancient Greeks separated from underground Alfejosu.

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Politics

Posted by greeceguide on December 3, 2008

Greece is a parliamentary democracy. At the head of state stands president, who is elected by parliament for a five-year term. Parliament has legislative authority and the president. Parliament consists of 300 parliamentarians elected for a four-year term.

Under the new rules for 260 seats in parliament are allocated in the system of proportional representation, and the remaining 40 automatically transferred to the lot, which had won the largest number of votes.

Executive power is exercised government and the president. Prime Minister shall be appointed by the President of the State, which refers to the party holding an absolute majority in parliament or a relative majority. The government must obtain a vote of confidence in parliament.

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More destinations

Posted by greeceguide on October 6, 2008

Greece is known for its ancient and medieval towns. Among the ancient cities include Delphi in central Greece and southern Epidaurus, Mycenae, Olympia, Old Corinth in the Peloponnese. There is also the Byzantine ruins of the city Mystra (Mistras). In central Greece, the Meteora monasteries.

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Attica

Posted by greeceguide on August 20, 2008

Attica (is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. Attica is subdivided into the prefectures of Athens, Piraeus, East Attica and West Attica.

Located in the south of the country, Attica covers about 3,808 square kilometers. In addition to Athens, it contains within its area the cities of Peiraeus, Eleusis, Megara, Laurium, and Marathon, as well as a small part of the Peloponnese peninsula and the islands of Salamis, Aegina, Poros, Hydra, Spetses, Kythira, and Antikythera. About 3,750,000 people live in the periphery, of which more than 95% are inhabitants of the Athens metropolitan area.

Athens was originally the capital of Central Greece.

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Fira

Posted by greeceguide on June 16, 2008

A multitude of fellow admirers cannot diminish the impact of Fira’s stupendous landscape. Views from the edge of the caldera over the multicoloured cliffs are breathtaking, and at night the caldera edge is a frozen cascade of lights that eclipses the displays of the jewellery shops in the streets behind.

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When to Go

Posted by greeceguide on May 9, 2008

Though it can be pretty wet in May and June, spring is just glorious in Hungary. The Hungarian summer is warm, sunny and unusually long, but the resorts are very crowded in late July and August. Like Paris and Rome, Budapest comes to a halt in August (called ‘the cucumber-growing season’ here because that’s about the only thing happening).

Autumn is beautiful, particularly in the hills around Budapest and in the Northern Uplands. November is one of the rainiest months of the year, however. Winter is cold, often bleak and museums and other tourist sights are often closed. Animal lovers might also want to skip this season: many of the women are draped in furry dead things throughout the winter.

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Athens

Posted by greeceguide on April 30, 2008

Athens (pronounced /ˈæθənz/; Αθήνα, Athina [aˈθina]), the capital and largest city in Greece, dominates the Attica periphery: as one of the world’s oldest cities, its recorded history spans at least 3,000 years.

The Greek capital has a population of 745,514 (in 2001) within its administrative limits[1] and a land area of 39 km² (15 sq mi).[3] The urban area of Athens extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of 3.37 million (in 2005).[4] The area of Athens prefecture spans 412 km² (159 sq mi)[3] and encompasses a population of 3.192.606.[1] The Athens Larger Urban Zone (LUZ) is the 8th most populated LUZ in the European Union with an estimated population of 3.89 million (in 2001).[5] A bustling and cosmopolitan metropolis, Athens is central to economic, financial, industrial, political and cultural life in Greece. It is rapidly becoming a leading business centre in the European Union.

Classical Athens was a powerful city-state. A centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum,[6][7] Athens was also the birthplace of Socrates, Pericles, Sophocles, and its many other prominent philosophers, writers and politicians of the ancient world. It is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy,[8][9] largely due to the impact of its cultural and political achievements during the 5th and 4th centuries BC on the rest of the then known European continent.[10]

The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by a number of ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all the Parthenon on the Acropolis, widely considered an important landmark of early Western civilization. The city also retains a vast variety of Roman and Byzantine monuments, as well as a small number of remaining Ottoman monuments projecting the city’s long history across the centuries. Landmarks of the modern era are also present, dating back to 1830 (the establishment of the independent Greek state), and taking in the Greek Parliament (19th century) and the Athens Trilogy (Library, University, and Academy).

Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics, with great success.

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